July 1961: The Guns of Navarone on general release

soundstageheros 960px

I have a definite memory of going to see The Guns of Navarone with my brother George and my cousin David while George and I were staying with David’s family in Wheatley, Oxfordshire. This had become a ritual every summer school holiday, taking the pressure of having five young children off our parents for a few days.

Such is the continuing influence of the film, there are many modern retrospective reviews all over the internet:

Mike’s Take

Gone with the Twins

Many further links on Rotten Tomatoes

More to follow.

With The Beatles

The Beatles played at the Top Ten Club in Hamburg on 1 July, and then travelled back to Liverpool on the following two days. They then took a holiday before their next live performance on 13 July at St John’s Hall in Tuebrook, Liverpool. They played a further 24 gigs in the Liverpool area between then and the end of July,. 

The month’s UK Top Tens

6 July 1961
1. Runaway: Del Shannon
2. Hello Mary Lou/Travelin’ Man: Ricky Nelson
3. Temptation: The Everly Brothers
4: Pasadena: Temperance Seven
5. A Girl Like You: Cliff Richard
6. Surrender: Elvis Presley
7. Halfway To Paradise: Billy Fury
8. But I Do: Clarence ‘Frogman’ Henry
9. Frightened City: The Shadows
10. Running Scared: Roy Orbison

13 July 1961
1. Runaway: Del Shannon
2. Hello Mary Lou/Travelin’ Man: Ricky Nelson
3. Temptation: The Everly Brothers
4. Halfway To Paradise: Billy Fury
5. A Girl Like You: Cliff Richard
6. But I Do: Clarence ‘Frogman’ Henry
7: Pasadena: Temperance Seven
8. Well I Ask You: Eden Kane
9. Surrender: Elvis Presley
10. Frightened City: The Shadows

20 July 1961
1. Temptation: The Everly Brothers
2. Runaway: Del Shannon
3. A Girl Like You: Cliff Richard
4. Hello Mary Lou/Travelin’ Man: Ricky Nelson
5. Well I Ask You: Eden Kane
6. Pasadena: Temperance Seven
7. Halfway To Paradise: Billy Fury
8. But I Do: Clarence ‘Frogman’ Henry
9. You Don’t Know: Helen Shapiro
10. Running Scared: Roy Orbison

27 July 1961
1 Temptation: The Everly Brothers
2. Well I Ask You: Eden Kane
3. Runaway: Del Shannon
4. You Don’t Know: Helen Shapiro
5. A Girl Like You: Cliff Richard
6. Hello Mary Lou/Travelin’ Man: Ricky Nelson
7. Halfway To Paradise: Billy Fury
8. Pasadena: Temperance Seven
9. Time: Craig Douglas
10. Romeo: Petula Clark

Source: officialcharts.com

Films released this month

One Hundred and One Dalmatians
Whistle Down The Wind
The Long Shadow
Source: filmdates.co.uk

June 1961: First four Richard Gordon ‘Doctor’ books published by Penguin

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We’re jumping forward a little here because although these four books were published in paperback in June 1961, I didn’t get hold of a copy of the first, Doctor in the House, until late August or early September. We were on holiday in Polzeath, where there was a small bookshop near to the corner of the beach. I distinctly remember going inside and spotting a copy of Lady Chatterley’s Lover on the shelf. I was of course too nervous to pick this up, let alone buy it, but I did buy a copy of the Richard Gordon novel. 

More to follow.

With The Beatles

The Beatles spent the entire month of June playing a residency at the Top Ten Club in Hamburg, and played 30 gigs in total, one gig every day. They also recorded a series of singles, some with Tony Sheridan on vocals and others on their own. The sessions took place on 22 June, 23 June and 24 June.

The month’s UK Top Tens

1 June 1961
1. Surrender: Elvis Presley
2. Runaway: Del Shannon
3. Frightened City: The Shadows
4. More Than I Can/Staying In: Bobby Vee
5. Blue Moon: The Marcels
6. On The Rebound: Floyd Cramer
7. Don’t Treat Me Like a Child: Helen Shapiro
8. You’ll Never Know: Shirley Bassey
9. You’re Driving Me Crazy: Temperance Seven
10. What’d I Say: Jerry Lee Lewis

8 June 1961
1. Surrender: Elvis Presley
2. Runaway: Del Shannon
3. Frightened City: The Shadows
4. More Than I Can/Staying In: Bobby Vee
5. But I Do: Clarence ‘Frogman’ Henry
6. Don’t Treat Me Like a Child: Helen Shapiro
7. On The Rebound: Floyd Cramer
8. You’ll Never Know: Shirley Bassey
9. Blue Moon: The Marcels
10. What’d I Say: Jerry Lee Lewis

15 June 1961
1. Surrender: Elvis Presley
2. Runaway: Del Shannon
3. Frightened City: The Shadows
4. More Than I Can/Staying In: Bobby Vee
5. But I Do: Clarence ‘Frogman’ Henry
6. You’ll Never Know: Shirley Bassey
7. Don’t Treat Me Like a Child: Helen Shapiro
8. Have A Drink On Me: Lonnie Donegan
9. Halfway To Paradise: Billy Fury
10. I’ve Told Every Little Star: Linda Scott

22 June 1961
1. Surrender: Elvis Presley
2. Runaway: Del Shannon
3. But I Do: Clarence ‘Frogman’ Henry
4. Hello Mary Lou/Travelin’ Man: Ricky Nelson
5. Halfway To Paradise: Billy Fury
6. Frightened City: The Shadows
7. I’ve Told Every Little Star: Linda Scott
8. You’ll Never Know: Shirley Bassey
9. Little Devil: Neil Sedaka
10: Pasadena: Temperance Seven

29 June 1961
1. Runaway: Del Shannon
2. Surrender: Elvis Presley
3. Hello Mary Lou/Travelin’ Man: Ricky Nelson
4: Pasadena: Temperance Seven
5. Temptation: The Everly Brothers
6. Frightened City: The Shadows
7. Halfway To Paradise: Billy Fury
8. But I Do: Clarence ‘Frogman’ Henry
9. Running Scared: Roy Orbison
10. I’ve Told Every Little Star: Linda Scott

Source: officialcharts.com

Films released this month

Taste of Fear

Flame in the Streets

Source: filmdates.co.uk

May 1961: Spurs win the Double. Those Glory Glory Days

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It may be 60 years since Spurs won the Double but, doing the maths, it’s sobering to think that it’s also now 38 years since the first and only time I saw Julie Welch’s 1983 TV film, Those Glory Glory Days. I still remember what a gem it was.

So, as I have already written about Spurs and the famous Double season, I thought this month I would cover the climax of the two competitions via the medium of the Welch film.

Those Glory Glory Days starts in the 1980s with a female sports journalist at White Hart Lane having to put up with a lot of casual sexism in the press box, with one of the main protagonists played by Richard Wilson. As she leaves, she bumps into Danny Blanchflower, played by himself, also working as a sports writer. He gives her a lift, something that actually happened to Julie Welch in real life, as she says in this article: “I met Danny for the first time in early September 1974, at Selhurst Park, and he really did give me a lift back to Fleet Street afterwards. It’s always difficult meeting God, but he was always brilliant to me. Incredibly talkative. A fine, fine man. Always my hero, for ever!”

More to follow

With The Beatles

The Beatles spent the entire month of May playing a residency at the Top Ten Club in Hamburg, and played 000 gigs in total.

The month’s UK Top Tens

4 May 1961
1. Blue Moon: The Marcels
2. Wooden Heart: Elvis Presley
3. You’re Driving Me Crazy: The Temperance Seven
4. Gee Whiz It’s You: Cliff Richard
5. War Paint: The Brook Brothers
6. Are You Sure: The Allisons
7. Don’t Treat Me Like a Child: Helen Shapiro
8. Theme From Dixie: Duane Eddy
9. African Waltz: Johnny Dankworth
10. Where The Boys Are/Baby Roo: Connie Francis

11 May 1961

18 May 1961

25 May 1961

Films released this month

The Curse of the Werewolf
The Shadow of the Cat
Double Bunk
Where the Boys Are
Spare the Rod
Les Nymphettes
Don’t Bother to Knock

April 1961: Yuri Gagarin becomes first man in space

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For an 11 year old boy, April brought the biggest news of the year: a man went into space. At 6.07 Moscow Time on Wednesday 12 April 1961, a Vostock rocket took off from Baikonur Cosmodrome with Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin on board. The spaceflight undertook a single orbit around the earth, skimming the upper atmosphere at 169 km high at its lowest point. The flight took 108 minutes from launch to landing. Gagarin landed on the ground in the Saratov region of the USSR inside the capsule, after the parachute opened at an altitude of 7km.

Not surprisingly, this story dominated the news around the world.

More to follow.

March 1961: Nicolaus Silver wins the Grand National

Pic: eBay

In 1961, we still went to school on Saturday mornings, but the afternoon was our own. Usually that meant Grandstand, and viewing it would trigger a lifetime habit of watching sport on TV.

Throughout the 1960s the BBC added various sports to its Saturday line up on Grandstand: Test matches, Wimbledon, Five Nations rugby, the Open, the FA Cup Final, the Boat Race.  Pride of place one spring afternoon every year was always given to the Grand National, an event that it had started televising in 1960.

A little remembered fact about the 1961 running of the National was the participation of two horses from the Soviet Union, Reljef and Grifel. A third Russian horse had also been sent, but didn’t run.

More to follow.

With The Beatles

The Beatles played 000 gigs in the Liverpool area in March 1961.

The month’s UK Top Tens

2 March 1961
1. Walk Right Back/Ebony Eyes: The Everly Brothers
2. Sailor: Petula Clark
3. Are You Lonesome Tonight: Elvis Presley
4. Are You Sure: The Allisons
5. Will You Love Me Tomorrow: The Shirelles
6. Who Am I/This is It: Adam Faith
7. FBI: The Shadows
8. Calendar Girl: Neil Sedaka
9. You’re Sixteen: Johnny Burnette
10. Riders in the Sky: The Ramrods

9 March 1961

16 March 1961

23 March 1961

30 March 1961

Films released this month

The Rebel

The Fiercest Heart

Source: Filmdates.co.uk

February 1961: Spurs beat Villa twice in Double chase

Pic: spurscollectables.com

On two consecutive Saturdays in February 1961, Tottenham Hotspur beat Aston Villa at Villa Park, sparking real hope amongst Spurs fans that the much-coveted Double of winning both the Football League and FA Cup in the same season was within their grasp. The first win, on Saturday 11 February, was their 29th match in the League, the second on 18 February was the Fifth Round of the FA Cup.

Spurs went into the first, the League match, in a commanding position: top of the table with 23 wins, two draws and three losses.

Source: 11v11.com

They had started the season with a never-equalled-since eleven straight victories. The 2-0 win over West Ham on Christmas Eve meant that their record stood at P23 W20 D2 L1. They had wobbled a little since then, so the two fixtures against Aston Villa would be crucial in determining how the rest of the season would pan out.

Match reports taken from Ralph Finn, Spurs Supreme, Robert Hale 1961, pp93-96.

 

With The Beatles

The Beatles played 36 gigs in the Liverpool area in February 1961. On 9 February they played for the first time as the Beatles at the Cavern Club in Mathew Street, where some had played previously as the Quarrymen. It was a lunchtime show, and they got paid £5 to share between them. George Harrison turned up in blue jeans, which were banned from the club, but he managed to convince the bouncer that he was one of the performers.

On 14 February, they played a Valentine’s night concert at Litherland Town Hall.  Paul McCartney wore a red satin heart, embroidered with the names John, Paul, George and Pete, on his coat during the group’s performance of Elvis Presley’s song Wooden Heart. The heart was later raffled, and the winner was promised a kiss from McCartney. However, when she claimed her prize, the stage was invaded by hordes of other girls. John Lennon was knocked to the floor, all the others were mobbed, and The Beatles were eventually rescued by bouncers. The show was temporarily stopped until calm could be restored.

The month’s UK Top Tens

2 February 1961
1. Are You Lonesome Tonight: Elvis Presley
2. Pepe: Duane Eddy
3. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
4. Sailor: Petula Clark
5. Portrait of My Love: Matt Monro
6. You’re Sixteen: Johnny Burnette
7. Counting Teardrops: Emile Ford and the Checkmates
8. I Love You: Cliff Richard
7. Perfidia: The Ventures
9. Rubber Ball: Bobby Vee
10. Buona Sera: Mr Acker Bilk

9 February 1961
1. Are You Lonesome Tonight: Elvis Presley
2. Sailor: Petula Clark
3. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
4. You’re Sixteen: Johnny Burnette
5. Pepe: Duane Eddy
6. Portrait of My Love: Matt Monro
7. Rubber Ball: Bobby Vee
8. Counting Teardrops: Emile Ford and the Checkmates
9. Buona Sera: Mr Acker Bilk
10. Sailor: Anne Shelton

16 February 1961
1. Are You Lonesome Tonight: Elvis Presley
2. Sailor: Petula Clark
3. You’re Sixteen: Johnny Burnette
4. Rubber Ball: Bobby Vee
5. Pepe: Duane Eddy
6. FBI: The Shadows
7. Buona Sera: Mr Acker Bilk
8. Walk Right Back/Ebony Eyes: The Everly Brothers
9. Rubber Ball: Marty Wilde
10. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson

23 February 1961
1. Sailor: Petula Clark
2. Are You Lonesome Tonight: Elvis Presley
3. Walk Right Back/Ebony Eyes: The Everly Brothers
4. You’re Sixteen: Johnny Burnette
5. Who Am I/This is It: Adam Faith
6. FBI: The Shadows
7. Rubber Ball: Bobby Vee
8. Will You Love Me Tomorrow: The Shirelles
9. Pepe: Duane Eddy
10. Calendar Girl: Neil Sedaka

January 1961: The inauguration of President Kennedy

 

It’s likely that I was at school on the following day, even though it was a Saturday, so I probably missed the BBC TV coverage at 12 noon on Saturday 21 January: https://genome.ch.bbc.co.uk/schedules/bbctv/1961-01-21

More text to follow

JFK Library page: https://www.jfklibrary.org/visit-museum/exhibits/permanent-exhibits/the-inauguration-of-john-f-kennedy
Pictures from Life magazine.

Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inauguration_of_John_F._Kennedy

Guardian archive piece from 50th anniversary https://www.theguardian.com/world/2011/jan/20/jfk-inauguration-speech-guardian-archive

 

Text here to follow

With The Beatles

The Beatles played 19 gigs in the Liverpool area in January 1961. This included a return trip to the Litherland Town Hall on Thursday 5 January, which was the first time Paul McCartney played bass guitar with The Beatles, as Stuart Sutcliffe had chosen to stay in Hamburg with Astrid Kirchherr. The Beatles were paid £7 10s for this appearance. In the audience were Johnny Guitar and Ringo Starr from Rory Storm and the Hurricanes, who had returned from Hamburg the day before.

[Source: beatlesbible.com]

The month’s UK Top Tens

5 January 1961
1. I Love You: Cliff Richard
2. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
3. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
4. Lonely Pup (In a Christmas Shop): Adam Faith
5. Strawberry Fair: Anthony Newley
6. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
7. Goodness Gracious Me: Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren
8. Little Donkey: Nina and Frederick
9. Perfidia: The Ventures
10. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes

12 January 1961
1. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
2. I Love You: Cliff Richard
3. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
4. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
5. Portrait of My Love: Matt Monro
6. Goodness Gracious Me: Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren
7. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
8. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
9. Strawberry Fair: Anthony Newley
10. Perfidia: The Ventures

19 January 1961
1. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
2. I Love You: Cliff Richard
3. Portrait of My Love: Matt Monro
4. Perfidia: The Ventures
5. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
6. Counting Teardrops: Emile Ford and the Checkmates
7. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
8. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
9. Pepe: Duane Eddy
10. Goodness Gracious Me: Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren

26 January 1961
1. Are You Lonesome Tonight: Elvis Presley
2. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
3. Portrait of My Love: Matt Monro
4. Counting Teardrops: Emile Ford and the Checkmates
5. Pepe: Duane Eddy
6. I Love You: Cliff Richard
7. Perfidia: The Ventures
8. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
9. Buona Sera: Mr Acker Bilk
10. You’re Sixteen: Johnny Burnette

[Source: officialcharts.com]

December 1960: The end of National Service

Text here to follow

With The Beatles

Having all returned from Hamburg to Liverpool by 10 December 1960, The Beatles played a series of shows in the city throughout the month. The 27 December 1960 performance at Litherland Town Hall was a breakthrough – with over 1500 tickets sold – and cemented their name as Liverpool’s top live draw.
[Source and picture: beatlesbible.com]

The month’s UK Top Tens

1 December 1960:
1. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
2. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
3. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
4. Goodness Gracious Me: Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren
5. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
6. As Long as He Needs Me: Shirley Bassey
7. My Heart has a Mind of its Own: Connie Francis
8. Little Donkey: Nina and Frederick
9. Dreamin’: Johnny Burnette
10. Let’s Think about Living: Bob Luman

8 December 1960:
1. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
2. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
3. Little Donkey: Nina and Frederick
4. I Love You: Cliff Richard
5. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
6. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
7. Goodness Gracious Me: Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren
8. Strawberry Fair: Anthony Newley
9. As Long as He Needs Me: Shirley Bassey
10. My Heart has a Mind of its Own: Connie Francis

15 December 1960
1. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
2. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
3. Strawberry Fair: Anthony Newley
4. I Love You: Cliff Richard
5. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
6. Goodness Gracious Me: Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren
7. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
8. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
9. Little Donkey: Nina and Frederick
10. Lonely Pup (In a Christmas Shop): Adam Faith

22 December 1960
1. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
2. I Love You: Cliff Richard
3. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
4. Lonely Pup (In a Christmas Shop): Adam Faith
5. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
6. Little Donkey: Nina and Frederick
7. Strawberry Fair: Anthony Newley
8. Goodness Gracious Me: Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren
9. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
10. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes

29 December 1960
1. I Love You: Cliff Richard
2. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
3. Strawberry Fair: Anthony Newley
4. Little Donkey: Nina and Frederick
5. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
6. Poetry in Motion: Johnny Tillotson
7. Lonely Pup (In a Christmas Shop): Adam Faith
8. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
9. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
10. My Heart has a Mind of its Own: Connie Francis

[Source: officialcharts.com]

November 1960: The end of the trial of Lady Chatterley’s Lover

John Frost Newspapers

Larkin is describing the time in 1963 when sexual intercourse “began” for him, when he would have been 40. This must be some sort of metaphor, because since his teens he had been in several long term relationships with women. The time span in Larkin’s poem covers 29 months, between November 1960 and March 1963. For me, this is from shortly before my eleventh birthday to shortly after my thirteenth. It was a pivotal time for a fairly precocious child, old enough to be fascinated by what was going on in the world. Every day, I would watch the television news on our little Ekco set, and read my parents’ newspapers, the Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail, from cover to cover.

I therefore plan to write a monthly diary about the events that occurred during that time, and how they impacted on me as I grew up.

We lived in a large detached house in Gerrards Cross, a family of five children. In 1960 we had lodgers, a married couple who lived in two rooms on the top floor, and also a 17 year old live-in mother’s help, called Sheila, who had the third room up there. My eight year old brother and I were day boys at a prep school called Thorpe House, ten minutes walk away. My father, who had joined the navy at the age of 13 as an officer cadet at Dartmouth, had retired from the service in his mid-thirties under the “golden bowler” scheme, which gave him a pension for life. He got a job as an engineer at the Guinness brewery in Park Royal, a 30 minute train journey away.

Reading the papers in November 1960, I could hardly have missed the coverage of the trial of Penguin Books under the Obscene Publications Act for publishing a novel by D H Lawrence called Lady Chatterley’s Lover. The day by day coverage referred euphemistically to the novel’s extensive use of “four letter words”, but the actual words were known to ten year old boys in school playgrounds up and down the country.

The trial was nominally the prosecution of Penguin Books for publishing an obscene work, but during its course it became obvious that the book had plenty of literary merit, and could therefore be justified. The prosecution therefore moved on to what Bernard Levin would later call an “entirely new complexion” in which it became a case against Lady Chatterlelf for committing adultery, for which act the jury was invited to condemn her.

The sequence of how the case came about is interesting to examine.

The thirtieth anniversary of D H Lawrence’s death fell in 1960, and to mark this anniversary Penguin Books decided to publish the final seven of his novels which had never been published in paperback. There was no controversy about the first six but the seventh was Lady Chatterley’s Lover, completed by him in 1928, but never published in a complete edition in the UK. His hardback publishers, Heinemann, had an expurgated edition available but at various stages between 1950 and 1960 nineteen different printings of the full text had been imported from the continent and seventeen had been issued with destruction orders. In another case a London bookseller had been prosecuted for selling an edition printed in Sweden.

In the meantime, in 1959, a new Obscene Publications Act had come onto the statute book, pushed through Parliament by future Home Secretary Roy Jenkins. This did away with the common law offence of obscenity, interpreted in different ways by magistrates and judges in different parts of the country. In one case in 1954, the Recorder of London actually declared that it was essential to “take a very solid stand against this sort of thing”, thereby prefiguring the writers of Father Ted by a good 40 years. In another case the same year, the prosecution of a serious literary novel was led by Mervyn Griffith-Jones QC who, using similar language to that he would later use in the Chatterley trial, asked if the jury would at Christmas time “buy copies of the book and hand them round as presents to the girls in the office – and if not, why not? The answer is that it is not the type of book they ought to read.”

[More to follow]

 

Sources:
Steve Hare, Allen Lane and the Penguin Editors 1935-1970, Penguin 1995
Bernard Levin, The Pendulum Years: Britain and the Sixties, Pan Books 1972
Jeremy Lewis, Penguin Special: The Life and Times of Allen Lane, Viking 2005
CH Rolph, The Trial of Lady Chatterley, Penguin 1961

 

With The Beatles

By November 1960, some of the musicians in the band that became the Beatles had been playing together for over three years. They made the final change of their name in August 1960, when Pete Best became their drummer. At this stage the rest of the band consisted of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Stuart Sutcliffe.

They spent the whole of November 1960 playing gigs at the Kaiserkeller, Hamburg, although Harrison was deported on 21 November, when the German police discovered he was under 18.  On 30 November McCartney and Best were also deported, on suspicion of arson.
[Source: beatlesbible.com]

The month’s UK Top Tens

3 November 1960:
1. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
2. As Long as He Needs Me: Shirley Bassey
3. Only the Lonely: Roy Orbison
4. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
5. Lucille/So Sad: Everly Brothers
6. Dreamin’: Johnny Burnette
7. How about That: Adam Faith
8. Let’s Think about Living: Bob Luman
9. Nine Times out of Ten: Cliff Richard
10. Tell Laura I Love Her: Ricky Valance

10 November 1960
1. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
2. As Long as He Needs Me: Shirley Bassey
3. Only the Lonely: Roy Orbison
4. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
5. Dreamin’: Johnny Burnette
6. Let’s Think about Living: Bob Luman
7. Lucille/So Sad: Everly Brothers
8. Nine Times out of Ten: Cliff Richard
9. My Love for You: Johnny Mathis
10. How about That: Adam Faith

17 November 1960
1. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
2. As Long as He Needs Me: Shirley Bassey
3. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
4. Only the Lonely: Roy Orbison
5. Dreamin’: Johnny Burnette
6. My Heart has a Mind of its Own: Connie Francis
7. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
8. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
9. Let’s Think about Living: Bob Luman
10. My Love for You: Johnny Mathis

24 November 1960
1. It’s Now or Never: Elvis Presley
2. As Long as He Needs Me: Shirley Bassey
3. My Heart has a Mind of its Own: Connie Francis
4. Rocking Goose: Johnny and the Hurricanes
5. Dreamin’: Johnny Burnette
6. Save the Last Dance for Me: The Drifters
7. Man of Mystery/The Stranger: The Shadows
8. Goodness Gracious Me: Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren
9. Only the Lonely: Roy Orbison
10. My Love for You: Johnny Mathis

[Source: officialcharts.com]